7 November 1920

18 William Street  ,

Streatham Hill, [sic] 1

London, S.W 2.

7.11.20

                My dear Daddie,

Very many thanks for your cheque.  The two Hall fees are not the same.  The one Moberly notified me about in the vac. for keeping my name on the books, also for use of library, etc – baths are the most important part of the etc. – The other is always paid by a graduate to his college on receiving his degree, an excellent ancient custom amongst men’s colleges eagerly adopted by the women’s.

Your loving daughter,

Margot.

 

1Margot has slipped between her Oxford and home addresses!

 

18 William Street  ,

Cowley Road,

Oxford.

7.11.20

                My dear Mother,

Many thanks for your letter and parcel, and also for the note.  The shortbread is delicious.  I am sending you off a parcel next week, as I have enough clean clothes for the moment.

I am glad you have better news of Grannie.  Is Auntie Bell any better?  I had an awfully nice chatty letter from Auntie Hilda this morning besides Daddie’s.

I am awfully glad to have finished at Milham Ford for the present, for it made me very tired, although I liked it.  Henceforth I teach one day a week only, so shall have a little time for my theoretical work.

Everybody at M. Ford was awfully nice, especially the history mistress, Miss Wyllie, who was, as it were , my O.C.  She is great fun out of school and very demure and efficient in her official capacity.  She is coming to tea with us on Wednesday.

The D’Oyley Carte have been here this last week.  On Thursday we went to see “Patience” – Joyce, Gilbert, Arthur Marsden, and I – such a jolly party.  Gilbert is a most entertaining youth – he kept not only us but the whole queue in fits of laughter.  It was rather cold, so we bought some roasted chestnuts off a passing barrow and ate them, also supplying a whole crowd of Madgalen School boys, who were behind us.  The show was very good, particularly the Dragoons.  It was surprising how many of the people in the stalls we knew.  Among them towards the front was Mr Asquith.

Last night the freshers gave their play – an Oxonian burlesque of “Alice in Wonderland”.  The mad tea party became a mixed coffee party with the door mouse as chaperone – “if I sleep while I chap. can I not be said to chap. while I sleep?”  Finally the progs appear, and in the subsequent enquiry it was decided that the tea party was illicit because the chaperone was only partially on the premises, having been put into the tea-pot!

I hope you are not working too hard, or worrying too much about Mrs Katsch or the business.  I am sorry to hear about Ted.  I will try and write to Emmie.

Your loving daughter,

Margot.

Next letter to be posted on 14 November 2017.

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